Saturday, March 1, 2008

SO, WHY AREN'T YOU RICH, SUCCESSFUL & HAPPY?

I received an email from an Internet motivational program purveyor today. His email directed me to his marketing website.

On the first web page that came up on my screen, was an e-book with the title "The Science of Success: It's All in Your Mind!".

After reading through the remaining web pages, I was not convinced at all by his seemingly rich offer, because he had made a real blunder in his sales pitch.

In fact, he outlined three valid reasons why 97% of people are not rich, successful & happy.

i) they don't work on their own development;

ii) they don't act on what they had read;

iii) they prefer watching TV;


Obviously, for me, & he should know better, the science of success is not what's in your mind, but putting what's in your mind to work in your life.

That is to say, knowledge is power when it is applied purposefully, meaningfully & productively.

Reading his web pages, one can easily realise that the primary focus of the purveyor is just asking you to pay your hard-earned money for all the known information, doesn't really make sense.

In fact, one of the free bonuses included in his rich offer is another e-book with this focus:

- the 20 questions you need to ask to find out if you have what it takes;

- the 13 Keys to Success used by all successful people;

- the 17 questions you must ask yourself to keep your focus on success;

In other words, the purveyor is pumping the buyer with more information!

I don't get any impression that he has an action-orientation or execution tool-kit in his rich offer.

Nevertheless, he has highlighted five great books:

1) Think & Grow Rich, by Napoleon Hill;

2) How to Win Friends & Influence People, by Dale Carnegie;

3) The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, by Stephen Covey;

4) Rich Dad, Poor Dad, by Robert Kiyosaki;

5) Conversations with Millionaires, by Mike Litman & Jason Oman;

From an operational or tactical standpoint, it is very clear that, if you just put the tools & strategies from any one of the five books to work in your life massively & consistently, success is within your reach.

NAVIGATING COMPLEXITY

I went back to re-read Bill Gates' Commencement Address at Harvard University last year. I had reproduced it an earlier post.

I just realised that Bill Gates actually shared an important lesson - & also a simple methodology - about navigating complexity.

I particularly like what he said at the beginning.

"The barrier to change is not too little caring; it is too much complexity."

This is what I have gleaned, in terms of a simple methodology for navigating complexity:

1) see a problem, which is the first step;

2) cutting through the complexity to find a solution;

According to him, cutting through complexity to find a solution runs through four predictable stages:

i) determine a goal;

ii) find the highest-leverage approach;

iii) discover the ideal technology for that approach; in the meantime, make the smartest application of the technology that you already have;

In his speech, he used the AIDS epidemic as an illustrating example.

"The broad goal, of course, is to end the disease."

"The highest-leverage approach is prevention."

"The ideal technology would be a vaccine that gives lifetime immunity with a single dose."

iv) "The final step – after seeing the problem & finding an approach – is to measure the impact of your work & share your successes & failures so that others learn from your efforts."

Wow! Great stuff from a great mind!

MAXIMISING YOUR LEARNING POTENTIAL

Yesterday night I tagged along with my gym buddy & his wife to his regular Wednesday night dancing session at the Jonathan & Peggy Dance Studio on the 3rd Floor of the Rochor Centre.

There were 13 of them, with 4 gentlemen & 9 ladies, including Peggy, the dance instructor. They were doing the off-beat cha-cha.

I was sitting down at one corner towards the tail end of their dance session, as I had earlier went to the nearby Kinokuniya Bookstore in Bugis Junction.

It was quite fun to watch them doing their slick body moves & fancy foot-work with the booming music from the CD player.

My gym buddy has always encouraged me to pick up dancing again, although I have a serious problem with kinesthetic movements, which I had mentioned in an earlier post.

I always believe that one should always maximise & leverage on one's natural gifts & abilities, irrespective whether one is learning or doing something.

I have done a lot of self-assessments to find out my brain dominance as well as personal learning styles.

The results from those tests have enabled me to focus on my personal strengths & to minimise impact from my personal weaknesses.

For example, I am a more logically-oriented visual-kinesthetic (85:15) learner. So whenever I attend a presentation or lecture, I will always sit in the front, with my scratchpad always ready to take on notes from the presentation or lecture.

I always have colour markers with me, & also love to sketch doodles, draw mind maps & use visual tools in my note making, in addition to marginal annotations.

Upon returning home, & depending on the novelty value & intellectual complexity of the subject, I often like to transcribe my notes into MindManager Pro &/or Inspiration.

I have also done several self-assessments on multiple intelligences.

I found that I am very strong in the area of logical-mathematical, visuo-spatial & intra-personal intelligences, but extremely weak in the area of body-kinesthetic & musical-rhythmic intelligences. The latter probably explains why I have problems with dancing.

Knowing my own strengths - & aware of my own weaknesses - has helped me to move forward with my own learning journeys.

I have come to the conclusion that if one wants to maximise one's learning potential, one must determine what one is really good at.

The next step is to broaden your mental horizons.

I read widely & voraciously. I am very proud of my personal library. I watch TV too, especially those documentaries. Of course, I also love watching the movies. Besides entertainment, I do my best to extract some learning points in the process.

I also attend workshops & conferences but more selectively. One has to be mindful here, as there are a lot of junk &/or fly-by-night operators out there.

I also make the effort & time to travel the globe, especially those exotic places to see how human ingenuity has taken place for millennia. [Here, all those TV documentaries come in very handy, as it is physically impossible to visit all the nice places in the world.]

I make new friends too, especially during my travels. It is also important to touch base with old friends. I meet up with my old classmates at least once in a year. The resultant sharing of personal experiences forms a critical part of my learning journeys.

Practically, every Wednesday night, I meet up with my drinking buddies (The Wednesday Club) with live music at the NUSS Guild House in Kent Ridge. We often talk about everything under the sun. That's learning too.

Undoubtedly, the Internet with all its attendant tools is a great space for networking too, from both the business & social standpoints, besides expanding my learning journeys.

Last but not least, put what one has learn to work immediately in one's life.

Remember, learning is or rather knowledge is measured by doing what you know.

In the words of Harry Palmer, the brain behind the Avatar technology on personal mastery, this is 'world experience' in contrast to the 'word experience'.

Do it. Just do it. Do it today! This should always be our personal mantra.

Hence, practice makes permanent. Maybe I should say, perfect practice makes permanent.

In summary, to maximise your learning potential:

1) determine what you are good at;

2) broaden your mental horizons;

3) practise;

TODAY'S VIP (VERY IMPORTANT POSE)

“Look not mournfully into the past. It comes not back again. Wisely improve the present. It is thine. Go forth
to meet the shadowy future, without fear.”

(Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, 1807-1882, who was probably the best loved of all American poets;)

Friday, February 29, 2008

MEMORABLE QUOTE FROM THE MOVIE


"I live my life a quarter mile at a time. Nothing else matters; not the mortage, not the store, not my team
& all their bullshit. For those ten seconds or less, I'm
free!"

(quoted by Dominic Toretto, played by Vin Diesel, as he related his dare-devil underground racing life-style to Brian O'Conner, an undercover cop played by Paul Walker, in the action-adventure movie, 'The Fast & The Furious')

MURPHY'S LAW AT WORK

I came across Murphy's Law way back in the early seventies, but I did not realise its true implications until only very recently.

For the uninitiated, Murphy's Law states that, "if anything can go wrong, it will, & usually at the most inopportune time".


My Singnet Broadband router (2Wire HomePortal 1800HG) conked out just after I had finished reading my email in the morning of Wednesday. It went dead on its own & could not be powered on.

After checking my Singnet documents, I found that the warranty period had already expired.

Worst of all, the unit could not be repaired, as it was already obsolete, according to the equipment distributor.

The Carrier central air-conditioning fan coil unit in my master bedroom broke down earlier on Monday night. Since I had an ongoing servicing contract with Carrier, their technicians came to check the unit at 11.30pm that night, & told me that it had to be replaced. It was about six years old.

I was impressed with the Carrier technicians, as they came to replace the fan coil unit on Wednesday afternoon, after confirming my requisition order on Tuesday morning. The replacement unit costed me almost S$420/-.

Surprisingly, my Korean-made LG automatic washing machine had encountered a massive leak on Tuesday afternoon. I checked the unit, & found that the rubber seal buffer between the rotating drum & the door needed to be replaced. After the computing the economics, I thought it was more cost effective for me to replace the six-year old machine.

This morning, just before lunch time, I had received my new automatic washing machine, a Samsung model, also Korean made, with a 5-year warranty on the motor, from Best Denki at the IMM Jurong East (I had ordered it only on Wednesday evening). It costed me S$360/.

This afternoon, following the washing machine installation, I went out to pick up the replacement router (2Wire HomePortal 2700HGV-2) from the distributor. It costed me S$280/-, but came with a 2-year warranty. The distributor was kind enough to configure the router for me, so that that it was plug & play, when I connected it at home a short while ago.

I was really glad that I had got all these new replacements completed today.

Tuesday, February 26, 2008

WHY PEOPLE FAIL

In writing this post, I have been inspired by Gary Ryan Blair, better known as 'The GoalsGuy' on the net.

According to him, here are the ten primary reasons while people fail in life, with my humble comments:

1) ACTION WITHOUT VISION:

- Joel Arthur Barker, the Paradigm guy, calls this 'random activity';

- the vision of where one wants to go & what one wants to achieve as a result must be very clear at the onset;

- it is the clarity of vision that brings purpose & priority to what one does;

2) VISION WITHOUT ACTION:

- Joel Arthur Barker calls it 'daydreaming';

- without a game plan & without putting it to work, nothing moves (as Albert Einstein is believed to have said, "Nothing changes until something moves!";

- please read my earlier post on developing a game plan with 'SMART';

3) UNREALISTIC TIME FRAMES & EXPECTATIONS:

- from my personal experience, the typical human thirst for 'instant gratification' has partly to be blamed;

- the best way to overcome this problem to start with baby steps; e.g. next 7 days; next 30 days; next 60 days; next 90 days or so;

- having a proper time planning system also helps;

4) 'WHY' NOT CLEAR:

- in reality, there isn't enough clarity in the thought processing, particularly during the process of defining personal goals;

- put it in another way, the purpose of wanting the goals in the first place is not yet appropriately defined;

- some questions worth pondering:

1) Do I really want it? Why?; 2) Do I really need it? Why?; 3) Is it worthwhile to have it? Why?; 4) Am I prepared to do whatever it takes to get it?

5) DENIAL OF REALITY:

- for most people, it is always difficult to understand & accept that perception is reality at work;

6) CONFLICTING VALUES:

- value clarification is never an easy task;

- from my personal as well as professional experience, one often needs a coach or mentor to guide & facilitate the process;

- when I first embarked on a disciplined goal setting process with 'Dynamics of Personal Motivation' (Success Motivation Institute) during the seventies, it took me quite a long while to sort out my value system;

7) DIFFUSION OF ENERGY:

- this is trying to do too many tasks at one go, generally arising from trying to have too many goals in pursuit;

- application of Pareto's Law is essential to sorting out one's goals as well as tasks;

- it's also important to identify high-payout activities in the first place;

- the balanced 'Wheel of Life' is worth exploring;

- also, it is important to reduce personal stress levels as it depletes one's energy very quickly; hence, practising some relaxation routines is a good antidote;

- learning the best practices for email, voicemail, interruptions & procrastination will be most helpful;

8) LACK OF FOCUS:

- I reckon this has more to do with the fact that the goals & values which one wants are not properly defined in the first place;

- I believe not realising the difference between urgency & importance, particulary relating to task management, also contributes to the problem;

- also the fear of making mistakes often aggravates the thinking, resulting in poor focus;

- for those readers who have undergone outdoor adventure training, the 'swinging log' provides the most enriching 'real-world' experience of the 'lack of focus';

- be very clear about what one wants in life;

9) TRYING TO DO IT ALL ALONE:

- the saying 'No Man is an island' is very true;

- networking or the buddy system often expedites the goal achieving process;

10) FEAR OF FAILURE:

- To me, I think the 'wanting to look good among the peers' is a greater problem that the 'fear of failure';

- the best way to overcome this is to take baby steps mentioned earlier & tie in a reward system for successive completion of each step;

- another way to deal with this problem is ask yourself: what is the worst case scenario if things go wrong? for me; if it is not life & death, then it is not a major issue to be concerned with, as long the contingent plans are in place to deal with it;

- also, learn how to relax, because worrying is another important issue that often arises from this problem;

[Gary Ryan Blair is President of The GoalsGuy. He helps business owners, corporate executives & sales professionals manage their time, set their priorities, & stay focused so they can achieve their goals, grow their business, & be more successful. Gary can be reached for speaking, coaching & media requests at 877-462-5748 or by sending an email to Gary@GoalsGuy.com]

SHARPENING YOUR STRATEGY FORMULATION SKILLS

Here is a link to numerous articles about sharpening your strategy formulation skills. You can download them for free & read them in your spare time.

Although they had been written singularly by Rich Horwath, author of two books entitled 'Storm Rider: Becoming a Strategic Thinker' & 'Sculpting Air; The Executive Guide to Shaping Strategy', which I had already reviewed in earlier posts, they are worth reading with an open mind.

I am currently in the process of acquiring the author's third book entitled 'Strategy Espresso: Triple Shots of Strategic Thinking to Energise Your Business'.

TODAY'S Q2P (QUESTIONS TO PONDER)

1) What can I stop doing ?

2) What do I do well that I must improve on?

3) What do I have to redesign in a fundamental way so as to be effective?

4) What do I have to start doing to be effective?

TODAY'S VIP (VERY IMPORTANT POSE)

"Man is like tea; put him in hot water & his true strength will come through."

(attributed to Confucius)

EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS OF THE BRAIN

I recall, from an early conversation I had with my late in-laws (my late father-in-law was a medical doctor, trained in China; my late mother-in-law, born in Hongkong, was an acquisition librarian with the National Library) during the late sixties, that a man with a broad forehead would often be classified as very smart.

This was apparently based on the Chinese know-how of face reading.

All I know from my understanding of the brain is that the pre-frontal cortex of our brain, located at the forehead, is our CEO in terms of executive functions. As our CEO, it coordinates & integrates most of our brain functions.

Operationally, it helps us to develop a working mental model of the external world, & to manipulate & transform this model in a variety of ways.

According to brain experts, these are the executive functions:

1) Planning: foresight in devising multi-step strategy;

2) Flexibility: ability for quickly moving from one to other mental attitudes as appropriate;

3) Inhibition: ability to withstand distractions & internal urges;

4) Anticipation: prediction based on pattern recognition;

5) Critical Evaluation: ability to analyse issues logically;

6) Working Memory: capacity to hold & manipulate information on live in our mind & in real time;

7) Fuzzy Logic: capacity to decide & choose with incomplete information;

8) Divided Attention: ability to pay attention to more than one thing at a time;

9) Decision Making: ability to make quick decisions, both in terms of quality & speed;

Is there a co-relationship with the broad forehead? I really don't know.

[Readers can read more about the brain's executive functions in Elkhonon Goldberg's 'Executive Brain: Frontal Lobes & Civilised Mind']

INGREDIENTS OF SUCCESSFUL AGING

Out of curiosity, I just went through some published literature on successful aging available on the net, & look what I had found, particularly in terms of the kind of key words they used.

In a nut shell, I reckon they would serve as useful skill sets for navigating your silver or golden years.

So, go & read more about them. Learn how they work. Experiment with them. Once they are put to work, you will have a great time enjoying your remaining years.

1) MENTAL VITALITY;

2) OPTIMISM;

3) SELF-RELIANCE & INDEPENDENCE;

4) SENSE OF HUMOUR;

5) CHEERFULNESS;

6) RELISENT COPING SKILLS;

7) RELAXATION SKILLS;

8) FINANCIAL FREEDOM;

9) SENSE OF PURPOSE;

10) FRIENDSHIPS;

11) SELF-TALK;

12) ACTIVE SEX;

13) PHYSICAL RISK-TAKING;

14) PHYSICAL FITNESS;

15) HEALTHY PRACTICES;

16) LONGEVITY EXPECTATIONS;

INGREDIENTS OF SUCCESS MOTIVATION

Out of curiosity, I just sat down & ran through some old newspaper ads put up by local purveyors of motivational courses &/or camps for professional adults as well as for school kids.

Look what I had found, particularly in terms of the key words they had used, not in any order of priority.

In a nut shell, I reckon they would serve as useful skill sets for successful living.

So, go & read more about them. Learn how they work. Experiment with them. Once they are put to work, journey on the highway of life becomes a breeze.

1) HAPPINESS;

2) COMMUNICATION;

3) ACTIONS;

4) GOALS;

5) MINDSET;

6) MOTIVATION;

7) ACTION vs REACTION;

8) ATTITUDE;

9) UNDERSTAND PEOPLE;

10) TIME;

11) TACTICS & STRATEGY;

12) NEGOTIATION;

13) DECISIONS;

14) HABIT;

15) CREATIVITY;

16) BALANCE:

17) QUESTIONS;

ALL BOILS DOWN TO HUMAN INGENUITY

I was reading today's Straits Times Digital Life interview with George Joblove, SVP at Sony Pictures Imageworks.

He was posed a question: "What sort of competitive advantage do you have if everyone has the same access to animation software like Autodesk Maya?"

His answer: "Our artists. It's very important to have the best tools possible (Anthony Robbins said that too!), (including) our own software. But tools are just tools. It's quality talent that really makes the difference."

Obviously, all boils down to human ingenuity at the end of the day. Human imagination, to be precise.

Likewise, the only difference between you & your competitors lies in your human imagination, as they also can have the same ready access to market information as well as technology enablement as you.

Monday, February 25, 2008

TODAY'S VIP (VERY IMPORTANT POSE)

"We know that there is no human foresight or wisdom that can prescribe direction to our life, except for small stretches of the way . . . Fate confronts ( us ) like an intricate labyrinth, all too rich in possibilities, & yet of these many possibilities only one is (our) own right way. "
(Carl Jung, 'Two Essays on Analytical Psychology')

Sunday, February 24, 2008

STRATEGIC FLEXIBILITY

In a rapidly changing world, 'mental flexibility' is a very important skill set for an individual person. Earlier, I have already written several posts on this topic.

Likewise, for a business, it's 'strategic flexibility'.

The following is a link to an interesting article about 'strategic flexibility' by Jim Hatch & Jeffrey Zweig. It's worth reading, as it is still relevant today.

I like the authors' treatment, particularly in dealing at the tactical or operational level. According to them, the ability to exercise 'strategic flexibility' is dependent on:

1. NOT BEING WEDDED TO A PARTICULAR CONCEPT;

2. CONSTANTLY SCANNING THE COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT;

3. STAYING CLOSE TO YOUR CUSTOMERS;

4. STAYING CLOSE TO YOUR EMPLOYEES;

5. MAINTAINING LOW OR VARIABLE OVERHEADS;

6. ADOPTING SYSTEMS THAT WERE NOT CAST IN STONE;

7. HAVING FEW DECISION-MAKERS AT THE TOP;

ACQUIRING BOOKS

I simply cannot stay away from acquiring books for my personal library.

Even though I had ceased to own & run my bookstore since mid-2005, I still go about acquiring new books.

The scratchpad on my work desk & the pocket notebook I carry in my vest often have a list of new books that I would like to acquire.

Amazon, B & N, & Kinokuniya Bookweb are my favourite book haunts. In earlier years, I also hung out at alibris & abebooks, but I had stopped doing that after they had raised international shipping costs to ridiculous levels.

Amazon is still the best of the lot, followed by Kinokuniya Bookweb. The latter, being local, has one setback: their inventory of books is very restricted, particularly in terms of my personal interests. Many times, their bookweb's online database does not reconcile with the physical availability of their listed items. B & N even has a funny system: it shows that the book is there, but it's not available for sale from B & N!

Whenever I feel the itch to get some new books, I will load up the relevant web pages of Amazon & Kinokuniya Bookweb simultaneously on my desktop - & whichever one offers the lowest price for the book I want gets the order. [For any book order over S$50/-, Kinokuniya delivers for free.]

As I have mentioned in my earlier posts, I don't often read books from cover to cover. I tend to go into a new book very quickly, & then focus on the sections or passages which can help me to think through my challenges or problems that I am facing.

To me, new books - & old books too - spur the thought processes. I find books, new & old, a great source of new ideas.

I tend to apply what I am reading to what I am thinking about. So, even as a book has its own agenda or theme, & while reading it, I like to formulate my own to satisfy what I need.

I come across new books from reading newspapers, magazines, newsletters, web logs, & listening to business as well as social conversations. From time to time, some of my friends may give their own recommendations. I also get email alerts from publishers & authors.

Whenever I come across a new book, I will check out Amazon first. If it's interesting, I will add it to my shopping cart. If I am not too sure, it goes into my 'Wish List' on Amazon. Recently, I noted that Amazon has one very disgusting habit: they tend to increase the prices of selected books in your shopping basket.

I also like to visit physical bookstores like Kinokuniya on the third floor of Ngee Ann city or one of their branches at Bugis Junction.

Whenever I am at IMM in Jurong East or Jurong Point at the end of Boon Lay Way, I will drop into Popular, but their display range is very poor. Whenever I am at Raffles City, Times is one my favourite places to go, other than the food court.

Nevertheless, I always tend to find many new books, which are often interesting & often still not yet captured by any recommendation engine.

I reckon physical bookstores are a good joint to pass time. I can just stand there to browse 5 to 6 books at one go. So, I don't miss the opportunity to drop into one, whenever I am free.

A few days ago, I had popped into the Kinokuniya Bookstore at Ngee Ann City. After spending about 45 minutes, I had bought the following books from my checklist:

- Appreciative Intelligence: Seeing the Mighty Oak in the Acorn, by Tojo Thatchenkery & Carol Metzker;

- Blindspots: Achieve Success by Seeing What You Can't See, by Claudia Shelton;

- Different Thinking: Creative Strategies fro Developing the Innovative Business, by Anja Foester & Peter Kreutz;

- Get There Early: Sensing the Future to Compete in the Present, by Bob Johansen;

- Leadership Blindspots & What to Do about Them, by Karen Blakely;

- The Opposable Mind, by Roger Martin;


I will be writing my book reviews shortly. Quite frankly, I have been quite lazy to write my book reviews in recent months. In fact, I have about fifty books or so stacked up on a book cart next to my work desk, just waiting for me to write the reviews.

PRAGMATIC INSIGHTS FROM THE EXPERTS

"My policy is learn from the past, focus on the present, & dream about the future. I'm a firm believer in learning from adversity. Often the worst of times can turn to your advantage - my life is a study of that. I aim very high, & then I just keep pushing to get a lot I'm after."
Donald Trump

[Readers can have a sampling of his latest ideas & opinions on The Trump Blog.]

GENIUS vs IDIOT

"The guy who invented the wheel was an idiot. The guy who invented the other 3, he was a genius."

This observation was attributed to Sid Caesar. [He is an Emmy-winning American comic actor & writer, best known as the leading man on the 1950's television series 'Your Show of Shows' & 'Caesar's Hour', & to the younger generations as Coach Calhoun in 'Grease' & 'Grease 2'.]

Benjamin Franklin is believed to have discovered electricity. Who was the guy who invented the meter to measure electricity consumption?

SELF-ANALYSIS

I have picked up the following ideas on self-analysis from the book, 'The Power of Purpose: Living Well & Doing Good' by Peter Temes:

1st Level:

- who am I?

- what do I want?

2nd Level:

- who do other people thaink I am?

- how do I look to them?

3rd Level:

- how do others look to themselves?

- how can I help others become the people they want want to be?

The following observations from the author are very enlightening & I fully concur with him:

- The clearest path to your own success & happiness is helping others get to where they want to good;

- Helping others look good in their own eyes & finding strengths & happiness in yourself by helping others feel stronger & happier;

- The more you focus on helping others, the more you will succeed in reaching your own goals;

TODAY'S VIP (VERY IMPORTANT POSE)

"It is Man's nature to dream & aspire, & then endeavour, deceive & fight to achieve his dreams & aspirations. Strategy is merely the word we give to the thought that goes into determining how we will prevail."
(Ketan Patel, founder & head of the Strategic Group at Goldman Sachs & author of 'The Master Strategist: Power, Purpose & Principle')

NOTES FROM MY SCRATCHPAD: 9 WAYS TO BE

1) be grateful;

2) be smart;

3) be involved;

4) be clean;

5) be true;

6) be positive;

7) be humble;

8) be still;

9) be prayerful;

[Source: 'Way to Be!: 9 Ways to be Happy & Make Something of Your Life', by Gordon Hinckley]

WHY DO WE NEED TO CONSTANTLY REFINE OUR IDEAS?

. . . because:

- ideas do not emerge perfectly formed;

- they are awkward amalgams of experience, insight, hopes & inspiration;

- they arrive on stage, blinking under the bright lights, hesitant, unsure as to the audience's likely reactions;

- they evolve & develop, alert to changing reactions & circumstances;

THE WISDOM PRINCIPLE

Participate only in those activities that are beneficial to you & wise.

Ask yourself:

- is this going to help me or hurt me in the long run?

- is this really a wise activity to engage in?